Worlds Hardest Math Problem Solved

Worlds Hardest Math Problem Solved-28
$/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator. $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. || $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. /$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. || $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. /$ Our final answer is J, $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. || $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. /$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices.

$/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator. $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. || $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. /$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. || $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. /$ Our final answer is J, $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. || $/$ We now have two expressions of $(x 1)$, one on the numerator and one on the denominator, which means we can cancel them out and simply put 1 in the numerator.$1/$ And once we distribute the x back in the denominator, we will have: $1/$ Our final answer is J, $1/$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices. /$.Simply assign a value for x and then find the corresponding answer in the answer choices.

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From what we know about functions and function translations, we know that changing the value of c will shift the entire parabola upwards or downwards, which will change not only the y-intercept (in this case called the "h intercept"), but also the maximum height of the parabola as well as its x-intercept (in this case called the t intercept).Now, we know that the tablecloth must hang an additional 1$ inches on #5: The position of the a values (in front of the sine and cosine) means that they determine the amplitude (height) of the graphs. Since each graph has a height larger than 0, we can eliminate answer choices C, D, and E.Because $y_1$ is taller than $y_2$, it means that $y_1$ will have the larger amplitude.Only once you've practiced and successfully improved your scores on questions 1-40 should you start in trying to tackle the most difficult math problems on the test.If, however, you are already scoring a 25 or above and want to test your mettle for the real ACT, then definitely proceed to the rest of this guide.If you’re aiming for perfect (or close to), then you’ll need to know what the most difficult ACT math questions look like and how to solve them. Now that you're positive that you should be trying out these difficult math questions, let’s get right to it!The answers to these questions are in a separate section below, so you can go through them all at once without getting spoiled.The absolute best way to assess your current level is to simply take the ACT as if it were real, keeping strict timing and working straight through (we know—not the most thrilling way to spend four hours, but it will help tremendously in the long run).So print off one of the free ACT practice tests available online and then sit down to take it all at once.These categories are averaged across many students for a reason and not every student will fit into this exact mold.) All that being said, with very few exceptions, the most difficult ACT math problems will be clustered in the far end of the test.Besides just their placement on the test, these questions share a few other commonalities.

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